Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
Book TV 26
Today 22
Q & A 9
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 81
MSNBCW 79
CSPAN2 73
CNNW 51
SFGTV2 48
MSNBC 28
KGO (ABC) 23
KNTV (NBC) 21
FOXNEWS 20
KQED (PBS) 17
KRCB (PBS) 17
CNN 16
KQEH (PBS) 16
ALJAZAM 12
KPIX (CBS) 12
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 647
Search Results 100 to 149 of about 654 (some duplicates have been removed)
her career as a lawyer for the n.a.a.c.p. in mississippi. also here, taylor branch, the historian who has, of course, written four books on dr. king and the civil rights era. his later "the king years" recently out in paperback. and our friend, ben jealous, the professional of the n.a.a.c.p. i want to start with you, marian. when you were there, did you realize at the time the effect that dr. king's speech was going to have? >> yes. and i realized as one of my own-- the hundreds of thousands property we were a transforming element of nonviolent witness that was unprecedented in our history, as you indicated, people expecting violence. here you had a huge, multiracial, multifaith, multigenerational-- i was 24 at the time-- witness -- >> what did you feel like? were you excited? >> i was exhilarated. i felt empowered. i felt connected. it's always good to know that you're not alone and there are all these people coming out saying, "we're committed to making america, america." it strengthened me as i was being trained to go down to mississippi and practice law. a great day. >> schieffer:
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
. h&m is second biggest market behind germany. a mississippi mom will become the first full time referee for the national football league. >> a little tight. a little tight. you got do move up on that. put director guard up. >> that is sarah thomas in action 39-year-old married mother of three on the verge of making history. she is one of 21 finalists in the nfl develop president program for officials. >> this is what i do, individually, i am a female, there are a lot of things that set up apart, race, gender, different backgrounds but we are out there all for the same goal. >> she spent 16 years over grade school, high school, and college games before discovered by an nfl scout. >> looks like she can throw a pass, too. next on abc7 news a sign that has drivers in northern california city scrapping -- scratching their head. can you spot what is wrong? wa >> later today at 4:00, george clooney sent a paycheck to spy on someone and who he is keeping tabs on by satellite. michael finney checks out a classic american car making a comeback with new high-tech driving features. >> don't
rainy morning as he found himself biking to his miserable job in mississippi he felt real despair. from recognized he was 47 years old and never had a car and afford for 20 years in prison. sometimes he says it's little things like that that can drag him down into sorrow. he chose to do something that both keep those wasted years fresh in his memory. he helps to educate others in the hopes that his story will spur reform. he's not an educated man. his formal schooling stopped in 6th grade. the katrina criminal justice reform effort. that's the holistic reentry program for offenders. he told anybody with time to spare and inclination to listen. putting a face on an abstract idea, injustice. on this particular afternoon in may 2012, he tells this story to me for a fourth time. he is deeply preoccupied with a judge who denied his case for years. who also heard his murder case in 1976. the month he was released the judge died. greg goes to his house to get his tattered obituary he's read many times. the obituary says nice things. the judge may have been a goodman, greg muses, he might have
is by no means at the heart of all of the chapters. there is mississippi. there is one chapter about the pivotal year, 1964, freedom summer. bob moses. they are trying to outlaw segregation. dr. king is in jail in st. augustine, florida, and in that one summer, partisan politics turned upside down in the united states. the democrats went to the party of south segregation that they had been for a century. usurping states' rights and a sign of tyranny in the government. the first republicans popped up in the south, and the party of lincoln gave way to the party of presumptive white people, so it turned partisan politics on its head in one summer. between the far reaches of texas and the atlantic ocean in 1964, the very first ones came up. the chapter right in the middle shows how the power of race and the power of this movement really drove partisan politics in ways that people do not appreciate today. that is part of our misremembering. we do not want to remember how powerful a force race can be in our politics. tavis: this was really one of the greatest movements, but what does your study of thi
in 1900. it is actually the oldest merit system west of the mississippi and it was essentially created in response to mass fraud and corruption in city government. so, to give you a perspective. the commission's mission is to establish, ensure, maintain equitable and credible merit system for public service employment. the commission's goal is to consistently provide the best qualified candidates for public service in a timely and cost-effective manner. and i'd also like to point out our equal employment policy which permeates through all of our rules, it is the goal to provide fair treatment of applicants and aspects of employment without regard to membership of protected category and [speaker not understood]. that's essentially what merit system means. the civil service commission is a five-member commission poby and approved with veto authority by the board of supervisors. it is an independent commission by chart of the mayor prohibited from intervening in the civil service commission's matters. the civil service commission department staff itself, we are a small staff of six indivi
failed over the weekend in mississippi. investigator say the instruttor and a student were dumping with five other skydivers and the equipment failed and they crashed in a swamp. the instruttor was killed but the student survived with multiple broken bones. >> rodriguez could play against the white sox even if major league baseball has other plans. later today the league is expected to suspend a-rod for the rest of the season over accusations that the third baseman used performance-enhancing drugs which the suspension could top 200 games and keep him off the field into the 2015 season. however, a-rod could still be allowed to play while he fights the suspension. >> there were no steroids. no one can do what he did. i thought you were innocent until proven guilty. until you have concrete evidence... >> 13 other players are expected to be suspended with him for links to a clinic accused of distributing performance-enhancing drugs. >> fast food workers are demanding better pay and the right to unionize. some workers who hold down two fast food jobs say they still not earning enough to
old housing stock. we have the oldest housing stock this side of mississippi. and that's where our problems are most likely to be. >> i going to test the microphone and ask people how you expect your home to perform. >> anybody who wants to share. tell us, what kind of building. do you live in a wood frame >> yes >> after a major earthquake. what's your expectation. >> i am afraid from last year's earthquake class, you mentioned. the house might pop to the street because my garage is empty. >> is it in the middle of the block? >> middle. >> there's less chance. sir, what kind of building do you live in? >> i live in an apartment if ground floor parking. >> in the middle of the block, corner. >> corner. >> are there openings on both sides? >> yes. on both sides. >> it's a wood framed building? >> it seems to be a hybrid. with concrete and steel and wood frame on top of that. >> we don't often see that. modern buildings have a podium. >> what neighborhood are you in >> dolores park. >> you will hit the lake. if are in the dolores, you are in pretty good shape. >> what is your expecta
was born in mississippi and raised in san francisco. but the february assault, sounds like something out of the the deep south in the early days. >> it's not what i would think would happen in san francisco. >> you're an end, you're just an end. >> prosecutors say 47-year-old david writh used the "n" word, and shoved the retired clerk into the the gutter outside this convenience store. >> i look at him, and he said, i'm a bike cop, and i'll drop kick your -- >> but he was no cop. he faces felony assault and hate crime allegation. >> we have this false sense of security, we're very progressive. >> they reviewed 23 cases of hate crimes. this community is the number one target u and they're reviewing more cases that may include the african american victims. >> we have the case of the the land owner dispute. the tenant is african american, and the land lord left a note offensive. >> he's in need of mental and physical therapy. >> it's hurt me, i have problems with white people passing me by on the streets now. >> nationwide, the fbi reports that 3,465 racial hate crimes in 2012, 73% of those
. and some showers and thunderstorms from mississippi to virginia. also be some scattered showers in the northeast. >> mostly 80s across the midwest and northeast. 90s for much of the south. and dallas is the hot spot at 104 degrees. >>> heading towards extinction. the standard feature you may not see the next time you buy a new car. >>> and a town in shock. fresh questions about how a large snake killed two children while they slept. >>> also new this morning a delivery truck goes airborne. we're learning more about how this happened and the driver under arrest in connection with the crash. ♪ when you recognize something isn't right, he call to the vetera crisis line at 1-800-273-8255 and press 1. >>> president obama visiting phoenix today, to reach out to the middle class about home ownership. the president will propose overhauling the mortgage finance system. he wants to phase out fannie mae and freddie mac. it would replace private firms to secure mortgages while the government provides oversight and insurance. >>> new money is buying out a piece of the old media. jeff besoz
want to sound smart today, tell your friends nevada, utah, wyoming, alaska, hawaii, mississippi and alabama are the seven states in the u.s. that do not participate in the power ball drawing. of course a lot of people go over state lines to buy tickets. the most recent state to join, california, added in november of 2012. more news, although power ball isn't necessarily news. >>> stephen colbert has a dream of many dreams of being rescued by a celebrity and it almost came true last night. >> help! >> steven? stephen colbert? >> matt damon? thank god you're here. >> oifs just walking by, what happened to you, buddy, are you okay? >> you mean other than the vending machine? >> no, i'm not okay. this is so great, i have always wanted to be saved by a big star. >> wow, somebody call 911. >> you are big, right? >> yeah, however hollywood's measuring that this week. >> it's usually based on box office revenue. what was your latest movie? >> promised land. >> oh, yeah, the fracing movie? >> oh, i got to turn this off. yeah, no, it's me. >> i got -- >> wait, what? i'm on my way. jimmy k
, mississippi john hurt me, sonny terry brown mcgee, i played some blues harmonica. >> did you learn that open tuning style, slide style? >> i have not picked up a slide in a long time, so i do not want to embarrass myself, but yes. it was a lot of folk music, blues and early on. i fell in love with the sound of the steel string guitar. there are a lot of idiomatic thing that it does well. i studied classic guitar a bit, but the steel string, for example, we do something called a hammer on and pull off, which is -- >> you get three note for the price of one. >> you plug the string but you get four notes. i always think of that town at the the prototypical steel string guitar sound. british isles, a caltech music. i learned all the paul simon songs. as i got older -- >> he is a hell of a guitarist. people do not realize. he is not flashy, but if you try to learn his tunes, they are really hard. >> he is a brilliant guitar player. i eventually got interested in jazz, world music, everything. maybe that is one of the reasons. i enjoyed so many kinds of music, i did not have a preference. i did no
you are 21, you are from mississippi, going through the police academy. it is 1989 and you are now working in los angeles. after being a patrol officer for just a few months, you are placed on gang detail. you have arrested a youth. instead of taking him to jail, you taken to his mother. the mother says, can you make him more afraid of you that of the gang members? the academy does not prepare you for that. i take that experience and i realized in the gang environment, most of these youths are coming from single- family households. in the area where the gang violence is most prevalent, great citizens of the community, 99% of those citizens are afraid. as a prosecutor, i take this experience and figure out how i want to enforce gang violence, especially in san francisco. i break it down into three categories. you have the individual who is not fully immersed in the gang lifestyle. he is just an associate comment just hanging out. -- associates, just hanging out. for that individual, we try to work with community-based programs. i've met with dcyf, the african- american steering comm
and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a felony conviction. consequences that really can cause great damage to a young life for many decades out. the very three things that can keep someone successfully in his or her recovery, access to housing, education and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can sho
. >> in the park in san francisco then to go back to mississippi or texas or whether we have escaped from. this is the only place on earth that we have so we have a special bloogs to maintain a sanctuary for lgbt people. i think this is the moment where the city is recognizing there's a problem and not all gay people are rich and thank you for your support >> thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i'm at lyric. i feel it's important for the commissioners to approve this as a former queer trans youth it's difficult four us i mean the queer and queer variant. when i was in the homeless shelter it was difficult i faced many prejudices. even when shelter say they address accident queer or the transgenders i know they don't. i notice a lot of any sisters from the age of 16 to 24 their subject to a lot of abuse and be it physical or verbal they suffer abuse in general. it's hard to exist in a closed-minded society. you're not seen as the person you are but whatever someone else knows you represent. so many of my sisters are forced out into the street to do prostitution or anyway to make
happened in the whole history of mississippi my country. me and my partner says we are people that have dignity and respected that's a what this means (clapping) and i know that mayor newsom or governer likes the word extra ordinary but the country is sending a message because lgbt community that their rights were not ongoing by now they have to pay attention. we're now going to end with marriage equality there has to be equality for all of us including our transgender brothers and sisters. we're not leaving anyone behind this is only the beginning. thank you so much let's keep fighting. (clapping) >> his leadership has been extraordinary not only in his district it's going to be the site of a tremendous celebration this evening so have fun but really citywide and really statewide seeing as a tremendous leader supervisor scott wiener (clapping). >> thank you. thank you although the voters are annoy my - i want to thank my former boss city attorney dennis herrera. i remember back almost a decade ago from the very first moment he was there for our community along with our lieutenant gov
that hillary cited her speech and she did cite examples were in the south, mississippi, texas, florida, south carolina. she is suggesting that since 1965 and 2013 the white people in the south are irrevocably racist and cannot be trusted. half of the country below the mason-dixon line still cannot be trusted and this is a person who wants to be president of the entire united states and this is the basis on which she's going to run to turn out as jason suggested, black voter turnout. in 2005 the federal election reform commission headed by jimmy carter and former secretary of state jim baker said that voter i. dchlt laws should be promoted because they will enfranchise black voters. she's suggesting that no one could possibly disagree with her. well, serious people do disagree with her on this. >> let me ask a political question, jason. what is the benefit for republicans pushing -- that's what they're doing -- a lot of these states are pushing this are republicans. not universally, but in north carolina the government flipped. the republicans pushed some of these laws. are they getting much o
southeast. stretching from mississippi and into the carolinas today. and the flood level is at minor or moderate level, which is going to be upping the risk of any kind of flooding across this area with additional rainfall. but it looks like it's going to be continuing the next couple days. we still have the monsoonal showers here, but no precipitation to talk about across the area where we have the red flag warnings still in place in much of the west. take a look at these temperatures soaring into the 30s. the heat from the gulf of mexico surging up here. toronto looking at 32 degrees. well above the average range. here across europe, the system is in the weakening trend, but it is going to still impact much of the central regions as it treks towards the east. gusts, hail and thunderstorms are capable to be unleashed. but the high pressure system covers much of western and central portions here. geneva, you're actually going to see that temperature up to about 30 degrees on your friday. this is going to be on the rising trend. now for your extended forecast. >>> and that concludes t
continues to impact southeast stretching from mississippi into the carolinas today. the flood level is at moderate level which is going to up the risk of flooding across this area with additional rainfall. looks like it is going to be continuing for the next couple of days. we have the monsoonal showers here but no precipitation to talk about across the area where we have red flag warnings in much of the west. take a look at the temperatures. 30s. the heat from the gulf of mexico surging. toronto looking at 32 degrees. here across europe system in the weakening trend but it is going to still impact much of the central regions as it treks towards the east. gusts, hail and thunderstorms are capable to be unleashed. but the high pressure system covering much of western and central portions here. geneva temperature up to about 30 degrees on your friday. it is going to be on the rising trend. i'll leave you now for your extended forecast. >>> and that's all for this edition of "newsline." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. thanks very much for joining us.  ♪ >> the wilson forum is the
the speech but the flow of blood -- couldn't make the march. because she was in jail in mississippi when the sheriff told the -- they beat her unconscious. she couldn't make the march. james couldn't make the march. he was in jail. the day of the march the people were in jail. and so i'm anxious for us to make a appropriation legislation event not just reflection and motivation. i'm already motivated. we are -- that's why you came here now. let me say reverend jackson. here is what reverend jacksons wants you to do. we need some money. we are having a reception next door. we knew we put together. we didn't get no sponsor. we need some support. i hope in all of our givings let us sustain ourselves. something we should ask people -- [inaudible] sometimes we can't fight if the people got the fight on the right -- [inaudible] am i right about that? >> yes. >> you wouldn't like to give $100 would you stand. we need the money real bad. >> you would give at least $100. stand. this is not personal. pay your way. >> pay your way. >> credit card, food stamps. stand up. stand up. keep standing. now
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> reporter: as the south resisted integration, president john f. kennedy grew frustrated, nelson says the president wanted to help blacks but also wanted to appease southern voters. >> the kennedys were sort of behind it but not really. i mean lip service was there. >> reporter: throughout that summer more than 300 freedom riders traveled through the deep south. in september the president's brother attorney general robert kennedy asked for and received more stringent regulations. by the end of 61, public transportation throughout the south was integrated. >> after the violent response to the freedom riders, president kennedy sent a bill to congress. he talked to the nation about why it should pass. >> now the time has come for this nation to fulfill its promise. the events in berming ham and elsewhere have so increased that cries for equality that no city or state or legislative body can choose to ignore them. the fires of frustration and discord are burning in every city. in demonstrations, parades and protests. which create tension and threaten
as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. it's just fantastic. >> there's no way in the world we ever believed we'd live long enough to see a black president. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> i cried, because it never occurred to me that i would live long enough to see a black man become president of the united states. >> for a black man in this societies, there's always been this need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public, because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still had to take the risk. i love bang black man in america, because it means that there's still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizens the way that's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american, you're a black american, but you really aren't an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans, we'll be
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
of mississippi arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought is let freedom ring. >> he played a spiritual song he has been listening to since the childhood. they helped them during the struggles. >> in the words of doctor martin luther king,jr. equality for everyone. freedom. you remind me that i have to be conscious of the inequality that does exist in the world. i don't know how much longer it's going to take with another 50 years or what. we have to keep the march going. >> u.s. secretary of defense chuck hagel joined the minster defense leaders in the southeast asian nations. it contains a number of security challenges including disputes over the south china sea. the agenda was overtaken by events in the mideast and talk of possible u.s. military action against syria. the obama administration identified the asia pacific region as an area of importance for the united states. hagel attended the asean defense minster's meeting on wednesday. he will join a wider discussion on thursday when minsters from china, japan and other countries join their cou
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
Search Results 100 to 149 of about 654 (some duplicates have been removed)